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    Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns Bahraini journalist and blogger Faisal Hayyat’s detention on the alleged grounds that he insulted religion in a tweet. Arrested after interrogation by the Criminal Investigation Directorate on 9 October, he is being held under a one-week detention order.

    Hayyat has presented a weekly satirical broadcast about politics, business and social issues on his YouTube channel (Sha7wal) since 2013, and has tens of thousands of subscribers.

    Read full article here

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    The Prince of Wales has been accused by a human rights organisation of not caring enough about the "crushing of dissent" in Bahrain as details of his trip to the Gulf state were announced.

    Human Rights Watch also criticised the Government, which requested Charles and Camilla tour the region, for standing "squarely and cravenly" behind the Bahrain administration, which has been accused of a string of abuses since pro-democracy protesters were violently suppressed during the Arab Spring of 2011.

    Amnesty International UK called on the heir to the throne to speak out about universal values like free speech and open debate when in the Middle East.

    Read full article here

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    As of the end of September 2016, at least three Bahrain-based reporters of major foreign news agencies were denied a renewal of their licenses to work in Bahrain, effectively banning them from working. The Bahrain Center for Human Rights (BCHR) is concerned about the ongoing and intensifying harassment of independent journalists by the Bahraini government.

    Mohammed Al-ShaikhMohammed Al-Shaikh, a photojournalist for Agence France Presse (AFP) based in Bahrain, was notified on 22 September 2016 that his request to renew his permit was denied due to allegedly “biased coverage.” Hence he is prevented from further undertaking his profession. Al-Shaikh has received over 200 international photography awards, one being the Bayeux-Calvados Award for war correspondents by Nikon in 2014 for a series of images taken during pro-democracy protests in Bahrain.

     

    Hasan Jamali, a photographer for the Associated Press (AP), was denied renewal of his license on 15 August 2016 by the Bahraini authorities. On his personal Facebook account he wrote a statement saying, “Hopefully independent journalism will be allowed again in Bahrain soon.”

     

     

     

    Nazeeha SaeedNazeeha Saeed, the Bahraini correspondent for Radio Monte Carlo Doualiya and France24, was summoned to the Public Prosecution and notified on  17 July 2016 that she is facing new charges for “unlawfully working in international media.” This incident occurred after Saeed applied for a renewal of  her permission to work for foreign media. She still has not received approval to renew her license from the Bahrain government. Saeed is a torture  survivor, who was tortured in police custody in 2011, where she was blindfolded, punched, kicked, beaten and subject to electric shocks, for covering the  pro-democracy demonstrations during the Arab Spring.

     

    Based on article 88 of Law 47/2002, which regulates the press in Bahrain, all journalists from foreign news agencies who are based in Bahrain, are prevented from freely conducting their profession of covering the news without first acquiring a license from the Information Affairs Authority (IAA), which must be renewed annually.

    Since 2011, Bahrain has placed severe restrictions on foreign media access to the country, resulting in the denial of entry to over 100 journalists in efforts to stop international media coverage of the ongoing political and civil unrest in Bahrain.

    Bahrain’s actions to suspend the foreign news journalists is in violation of freedom of expression as protected under Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as well as under Article 19 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

    Based on the facts and cases above, BCHR expresses its deep concern about the right to freedom of expression being undermined and calls on the authorities of Bahrain to:

    • Allow journalists to conduct their profession and to respect their right to freedom of expression;
    • Cease arbitrarily withholding license renewals; and
    • Drop the charges against journalists who exercise their work.
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    Bahrain's Court of Cassation overturned a nine-year jail term against Al-Wefaq Secretary-General Sheikh Ali Salman.

    Read the full article here

     

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    What is the truth behind the events that took place on Monday (September 26, 2016) during the trial of the Bahraini Shia spiritual leader Ayatollah Sheikh Isa Qassim and two other defendants- the case which is based on accusations of "money laundering" linked to the Shiite religious obligation of Khums (alms).

    Read full article here

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    The Gulf State of Bahrain is known for its extravagance. Gloating over multi-million dollar investments in tourism, sports and banking, the kingdom does not shy away from showing off with the Grand Prix races, or celebrity visitors the likes of Kim Kardashian. This alone, makes the Kingdom look like a miracle of some sort to many who associate the Middle East with subsequent failures, instability and conflict.

    However, what does not make international headlines anymore is a resilient and defiant social movement and creative forms of civil disobedience challenging the kingdom’s legitimacy and holding it accountable to its human rights violations. For decades, but especially since the uprising of 2011, Bahrain housed a call for democracy and fundamental rights, which consequently led to thousands of people jailed and tortured - some even to death. Many continue to be jailed for merely advocating for democracy and fundamental rights. Two things Western democracies have ample support for in theory but not so much in practice, especially outside their borders. The US, and UK, and many other EU states, are the biggest enablers of Bahrain in arms and trade.

    Continue reading here.

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    Bahraini Court of Cassation overturned a nine-year jail term against opposition chief cleric Ali Salman, convicted of inciting hatred and calling for forceful regime change.

    The court also overturned three death sentences and seven life imprisonment sentences against a group convicted of killing three police, including an Emirati officer, in a bomb attack more than two years ago.

    Continue reading here.

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  • 10/19/16--01:00: Bahrain and human rights
  • Sir, – In her defence of Northern Ireland training Bahrain’s interior ministry Bahrain deserves a chance to prove itself on human rights, Opinion & Analysis, October 17th), the former prisons ombudsman Pauline McCabe misses the point. Bahrain has been given a chance to reform, but it has failed.

    Continue reading here.

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    The Irish Times this week ran an opinion piece defending the Northern Ireland Policing Board's training and financial support for Bahraini security forces. When rights group Reprieve uncovered that a state-owned Belfast business trained forces in Bahrain that use torture, staff in Northern Ireland who worked on projects aimed at "reforming" Bahrain's criminal justice system went on the defensive. Pauline McCabe argued that “the sharing of experience, best practice and skills” is critical for progress. But organisations and experts in Northern Ireland who want to see reform in Bahrain cannot disregard local rights experts in the process. Instead of defending the surface level reforms of Bahrain's criminal justice institutions, the Northern Ireland Policing Board ought to be consulting with Bahraini human rights defenders. The sheer number of them who have been imprisoned and tortured for their peacefully advocacy makes them experts on the need for criminal justice reform in Bahrain.

    Continue reading here.

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    BRITISH police have advised their Bahraini counterparts on how to “whitewash” deaths in custody, international human rights group Reprieve alleged yesterday.
     
    The guidance was part of a widely criticised multimillion-pound training deal with the Gulf kingdom, where security forces routinely rely on torture and the death penalty, both banned under international law.
     
    Bahrain’s poor human rights record has been highlighted recently by the case of Mohammed Ramadan, who has been held on death row since 2014. His lawyers allege that he was tortured into making a false
    confession.
     
    Read full article here
     
     
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    A human rights group has voiced concern after a company owned by Invest NI facilitated meetings between the Police Ombudsman and investigators from Bahrain.

    Reprieve hit out after it emerged that officers from the Special Investigations Unit (SIU) in the Persian Gulf nation met with officials from Michael Maguire’s office in a meeting set up by NI-CO (Northern Ireland Co-operation Overseas).

    Reprieve said it has obtained correspondence through freedom of information legislation which shows that officials from Bahrain wanted to be briefed on a particular ombudsman case where a PSNI officer had been vindicated.

    Read full article here

     

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    Bahrain Mirror: Bahrain's security forces raided today (Thursday October 20, 2016) the headquarters of Bahrain's biggest opposition society, The National Islamic Society, al-Wefaq in Bilad al-Qadeem, according to eyewitnesses.

    Activists confirmed that security forces also raided the branch office of al-Wefaq Society in the Western Region, in the town of Malikiya. Photos circulated showed that the forces were confiscating the possessions and properties of the society.

    Read full article here

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    A mass protest set off from the Imam Al-Sadiq mosque in Diraz, condemning the prevention of Shia majority from performing their largest Friday prayer since over 3 months.

    During the protest on (October 21, 2016), protestors denounced the sectarian persecution practiced by the government and urged to stop it. 

     

    See the full article here

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    Bahraini scholars denounced the raiding on the Al-Wefaq National Islamic Society's headquarters (the largest opposition association) by the security authorities, and the confiscation of their belongings aiming at selling them in an auction.

    The scholars wondered in a statement they issued on (Saturday, October 22, 2016): "Does the government think it will auction the spirits and minds of the majority of the citizens?" considering that what happened pushes the country back "more than three decades, by deleting the people's voice, practically dissolving the parliament, and exchanging the authorities' rules with ones worse than the state security law."

     

    Read the full article here

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    The Danish political magazine Ræson published the article below (English) by BCHR's Vice-President Said Yousif Al-Muhafdha on 19 October. Ræson is a completely independent non-profit magazine about politics in Denmark and in the world.

    See full article in Danish here.

     

    Is Bahrain the new breeding ground for political extremism?

    How the government’s unprecedented crackdown on civil society and human rights might radicalize some of its citizens

    By Said Yousef Al-Muhafdah, Vice-President of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights (BCHR)

    On 10 September, the newspaper Information headlined that restrictions for immigrants can contribute to radicalization. Reporting on new immigration-related restrictions that are part of the government’s “2025 plan”, it was highlighted that these policies might have a radicalizing effect, particularly among the Muslim community in Denmark.

    Following the so-called “hometown terrorism” incidents of Brussels, Paris, Nice and Copenhagen – in which mainly native-born but seemingly disadvantaged and marginalized citizens like Omar el-Hussein, a Dane of Palestinian origin, were the main perpetrators – Danish politicians have voiced concerns about legal restrictions that might foster the radicalization of those who already feel excluded from Danish society. Draconian policies, they warned, might only exacerbate feelings of distrust towards Denmark.

    The article leaves the reader with a nagging question, however: If citizens in Denmark - still one of the most liberal, tolerant, open-minded and safest places on earth - acknowledge the risk of radicalization posed by the intensification of restrictions, how much higher is this risk in countries where governments not only restrict people but even subject them to actual harm? More to the point: how much larger is the threat of radicalization when people’s daily lives consist of systematic stigmatization, oppression, persecution and torture?

    The small desert island of Bahrain lies off the shore of Saudi Arabia, with which it shares much more connections than just the King Fahd Causeway. Like their Saudi neighbors, Bahrain is ruled by an autocratic dynasty. The Al-Khalifa family is for Bahrain what the Al-Saud’s are for Saudi Arabia: an unquestionable, unchallenged and self-righteous powerhouse that is deeply interwoven with the state structures. They simply can’t imagine their countries being ruled by anyone else.

    The Al-Khalifas have ruled Bahrain since 1783 as “Hakims” and “Emirs” before the current monarch, Hamad, who assumed his father Isa’s throne in 1999, declared himself “King” in 2002. Hamad reigns with almost absolute power, while his uncle Khalifa acts as Prime Minister. The latter took office in 1970, when Bahrain was still administered by the British, and he is by now the world’s longest-serving current prime minister.

    In February 2011, when the Al-Khalifa dynasty faced its own Arab Spring and looming demise, King Hamad could rely on his Saudi friends and their troops, who rolled in and suppressed the pro-democracy movement with brutal efficacy. Nevertheless, the calls for change have never ceased among the 1.3 million people of Bahrain. For years, demonstrations have taken place on a weekly basis, while the government often responds with an iron fist. In sum: the movement smolders under the surface.

    This summer, the Al-Khalifas struck out with a sweeping campaign to silence all dissent and make clear who remains in the driver’s seat of the country. In June, the largest political opposition party Al-Wefaq was dissolved within a few days, their assets liquidated and various members arrested. At the same time, a delegation of Bahraini human rights defenders was prevented from travelling to Geneva to the United Nations Human Rights Council session, and Bahrain’s most prominent activist and the president of BCHR, Nabeel Rajab, was arrested.

    The authorities charged Rajab for "spreading false news and rumors about the internal situation in a bid to discredit Bahrain" over Twitter posts from 2015 about well-documented cases of torture in a Bahraini prison. Rajab is facing 15 years if convicted, while still awaiting his repeatedly postponed trial. Early this month, after a letter under his name was published in the New York Times, another charge was added. This charge was based on his claims that the authorities have attempted to threaten him into silence and that, after a meeting with US Secretary of State John Kerry, he was interrogated by Bahrain’s Anti-Cybercrimes unit.

    Of course Rajab is just the most prominent victim of the government’s crackdown.

    Many other people share Rajab’s fate and have been convicted for their activism or criticism. Under Bahraini law, criticism and insults against the ruling family or state authorities are punishable with up to seven years in prison or a fine of up to 10,000 Bahraini Dinars (175,000 DKK). The laws are left vague, giving space to the authorities to consider criticism and political dissent as insults, incitement of hatred, or even promotion of terrorism. Freedom of expression is thus extremely limited in Bahrain. Since the beginning of 2016, BCHR has recorded ten sentences based on such charges with total prison terms of 27 years and five months.

    The internet has become a major battlefield in the government’s war on free expression. Bahrain may have the highest Internet and mobile phone usage in the Gulf region, but Bahrainis feel the least safe expressing their opinion on political issues in the region. Media and telecommunication providers are subjected to excessive restrictions, while tracking software and censorship tools ensure the government can prosecute unwelcome commentators and maintain full control over the flow of information. Online coverage and speed are frequently limited in various parts of the country as acts of reprisal. Hundreds of websites are blocked, many of which have nothing to do with pornography, terrorism or violence, to which the restrictive laws refer. The primary targets consist of sites that present critical views or expose human rights violations. Strikingly, sites affiliated to terrorist groups like Daesh (ISIS) are still accessible in Bahrain - despite it being a counterterrorism partner against Daesh. It is obvious that the government wants to shut down the last window for people’s voices in Bahrain, so the Internet becomes a tool for sharing photos of your dinner, not more. Unsurprisingly, Reporters Without Borders have continuously categorized Bahrain as an “Enemy of the Internet” since 2012.

    In addition to cyber space, the government has imposed similar restrictions on physical areas as well. The village of Duraz is currently being besieged and cut off from the rest of the country for more than two months now - the entire town seems to have become an enemy of the state. The approx. 25,000 inhabitants of Duraz are being collectively punished for a peaceful sit-in that started in late June after the government revoked the citizenship of Bahrain’s highest Shia cleric Sheikh Isa Qassim as an act of reprisal, while additionally charging him over accusations of money laundering in relation to one of major Shia religious duties. Thousands of people have since come together outside Sheikh Qassim’s house in Duraz to protest against the decision and keep doing so despite the government’s blockade of the town. Bahraini security forces closed off all roads leading into and out of the town with cement blocks, barbed wire and sandbags. At two checkpoints, people who are not registered residents of Duraz are being prohibited from entering the town area.

    As demonstrations are not allowed in Bahrain unless the Ministry of Interior permits them, courts have started to hand down one- to two-year-long prison sentences to Duraz protesters for “illegal gatherings” since late August. Not surprisingly, it is mostly clerics of the Shia community who are prosecuted and convicted over the support for their spiritual leader Sheikh Qassim.

    Just as the government disproportionately targets the country’s Shia majority, it simultaneously favors the Sunni minority to which the Al-Khalifa family belongs. However, the crux of the matter is that the Al-Khalifas follow Sunni Islam and typically favor Sunnis when allocating public offices or social benefits. Despite constituting the majority of the population with 60-70%, the Shiites of Bahrain feel discriminated against and extremely underrepresented politically. These feelings were stoked even more by Sheik Qassim’s trial, verdicts against other high Shia clerics, and – last but not least – the dissolution of the largest opposition party Al-Wefaq, a mainly Shiite party.

    When we return to the initial question – whether radicalization might grow through intensified restrictions – we, of course, do well to bear this threat in mind. In Denmark it may seem to be a very long shot, but in Bahrain, the chances for home-grown extremism are far more serious.

    The civic space in Bahrain is extremely constrained - for anyone, from human rights activists to daily Twitter users, from Shiite cleric to Duraz resident. Almost all parts of the society share certain characteristics, which - according to Antony Blinken from the US Department of State - pave the road towards violence that include feelings of alienation and exclusion (...), experiences with state sanctioned violence, heavy handed tactics by security services, and the systematic denial of opportunity”.

    Is there an actual, safe option to voice criticism or to call for reforms in Bahrain? Hardly. The lack of such available platforms for an exchange of views, paired with a constant threat of punishment and persecution, is the breeding ground for radicalization and extremism. To many who have been imprisoned and tortured for peacefully pursuing change, violence may unfortunately appear to be the only outlet through which to address deepening grievances.

    Danish authorities define such radicalization as a process, by which a person to an increasing extent accepts the use of undemocratic or violent means, including terrorism, in an attempt to reach a certain political/ideological objective.

    Various observers of Bahrain have drawn predictions about possible radicalization trends in response to the government’s repressive policies. During a panel discussion in February 2015, Nabeel Rajab, the detained BCHR president, said that while the Bahraini government is vocally opposed to extremism in the region, it is actually quite tolerant of extremist ideas within its borders, which could lead to increased radicalization within the country.

    In fact, the Al-Khalifas keep adding fuel to the fire by actively recruiting Arab and foreign Sunnis for their police and military forces, and more generally as a demographic counterweight against its indigenous Shia majority. Is the old dynasty aware of the side-effects of their intensified anti-Shia and anti-reform policies? Or has the genie already been let out of the bottle and can no longer be controlled?

    As early as 2012, Bahrain expert Justin Gengler from Qatar University stressed in a Foreign Policy article that the government of Bahrain has exploited — even cultivated — the fears and suspicions of other citizens, in particular those of its traditional Sunni support base.He outlined that many Sunnis, driven by the anti-Shia sentiments of the ruling family, overstepped the mark and went into full opposition to anyone who would dare suggest political compromise - including allies like the United States or even King Hamad himself.

    In January 2015, the Huffington Post featured an article of two risk analysts, who claimed that the influence of Daesh sympathizers within the Bahraini government’s political structure has grown as a result of Manama’s authoritarian and anti-Shi’ite policies of the post-Arab Awakening era. The authors refer to the case of Turki Al-Binali, a Bahraini national and leading IS ideologue, who was allowed to hold a demonstration outside the US embassy in the Bahraini capital Manama, during which pictures of Osama Bin Laden, as well as al-Qaeda flags, were held up by protesters.

    It is strange to imagine that a country, which is home to the Fifth Fleet of the US Navy and which deployed two fighter jets to bomb Daesh in Syria, follows a seemingly inconsistent anti-terror policy at home. The pressure therefore lies also on Bahrain’s powerful allies and reliable weapons dealers like Saudi Arabia, the United States and the United Kingdom. While the US and UK have a long history of ignoring human rights abuses in favor of stability for their questionable allies, it is obvious that the Saudis, who themselves deal with serious accusations of human rights violations, are not aiming to talk to the Al-Khalifas about reforms.

    The question is this: How much longer can Western allies ignore the looming threat of yet another country that drowns in homemade political and religious extremism, or yet another group à la Al-Qaeda or Daesh that mushrooms out of a constant atmosphere of repression, fear and hopelessness?

    Moreover, we should not forget Denmark’s role as a political player in this context: On the one side, there is Danish-Bahraini citizen, Abduhlhadi Al-Khawaja - one of the leading figures during the 2011 pro-democracy movement - who serves a life sentence in a Bahraini prison for his peaceful human rights activism. Two of his daughters, Zainab and Maryam, who are activists and Danish citizens themselves, have also been harassed, arrested and threatened by Bahraini authorities. Ultimately, they chose a life in exile in Copenhagen, facing immediate imprisonment if they ever return to Bahrain.

    On the other side, there is Bahrain’s King Hamad, who received the order of the Grand Cross of the Dannebrog (Storkorset af Dannebrog) - one of the highest Danish orders. Queen Margrethe presented King Hamad with the order in February 2011 - only two weeks before he called in the Saudi troops. Ultimately, the Danish government and the international community must choose to support peaceful dissent and legitimate demands of rights or violent suppression and absence of reform before it’s too late.

    See full article in Danish here.

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    How the government’s unprecedented crackdown on civil society and human rights might radicalize some of its citizens

    By Said Yousef Al-Muhafdah, Vice-President of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights (BCHR)

    In January 2015, the Huffington Post featured an article of two risk analysts, who claimed that “the influence of Daesh sympathizers within the Bahraini government’s political structure has grown as a result of Manama’s authoritarian and anti-Shi’ite policies of the post-Arab Awakening era.” The authors refer to the case of Turki Al-Binali, a Bahraini national and leading IS ideologue, who was allowed to hold a demonstration outside the US embassy in the Bahraini capital Manama, “during which pictures of Osama Bin Laden, as well as al-Qaeda flags, were held up by protesters.”

    See the Danish version of the article on Ræson's platform and the English version published by BCHR here.

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    Family of journalist Faisal Hayyat said that he was transferred to the Dry Dock Prison's clinic 3 time since he was arrested two weeks ago, due chest pains and high temperature.

    The family added that Hayyat was held in a crowded room that includes 12 persons arrested over different criminal cases, adding that the detainees spend 23 hour in the rooms and are only allowed to go to the prison's yard for one hour.

    Hayyat's family demanded his release with the continuation of his trial for being a "media person and not a tweeter," expressing its surprise that none of the organizations and institutions interested in media people and press in Bahrain interfered.

     

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    Reporters Without Borders (RSF) released today (Monday 24, 2016) the names of the 22 nominees for the 2016 Reporters Without Borders-TV5 Monde Prize for Press Freedom, among them a Bahraini journalist facing a possible life sentence in prison, and a citizenship revocation. 

    In the "Citizen Journalists Set Up" profile, RSF said that the detainee Ali al-Mearaj (one of the managers of opposition Lulu-Awal website), might face a life imprisonment sentence and citizenship revocation, based on the charges by security forces.

     

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    Monday October 31 will be a vital test for Bahrain. Two scheduled court verdicts will give a major indication on whether the regime is taking any notice of international pressure to finally ease off its months-long repressive outburst, a clear signal on where the country’s much-vaunted reform project is really headed.

    Opposition figure Khalil Al Halwachi and human rights defender Nabeel Rajab are both due to hear the outcome of their separate sham trials. Al Halwachi, a founder of the opposition Amal group, was arrested in September 2014 and has been tried with 16 others. Like many in custody in Bahrain, he says he has been tortured into making a false confession.

     

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    Bahraini authorities must immediately and unconditionally release human rights activist Nabeel Rajab and opposition leader Fadhel Abbas, two prisoners of conscience who are facing long prison sentences for using Twitter to voice concerns about human rights abuses in the conflict in Yemen, Amnesty International said today.

    Both men have criticized the killing of civilians in Yemen by the Saudi Arabia-led coalition, which includes Bahrain. They have already been wrongfully detained for months and are expecting their respective court’s verdicts in the next week.

     

    Read the full article here

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